Writetreat



Reblogged from fuckyeahhistorycrushes
fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Believe it or not, this handsome young thing is Charlie Chaplin! Yes, THAT Charlie Chaplin. The Little Tramp. The Dictator. When he was 9 he was sent to the workhouse because his mother was committed to an insane asylum & his father wasn’t on the scene. At 19 he went to the US to begin his film career. He was one of the founders of United Artists, giving actors, writers & directors control over their own work. During WWI he became the most famous actor in the world. His career was derailed by scandal, including paternity suits, divorce & a barely legal wife. All was forgiven by the 1970s, when he was given an honourary Lifetime Achievement by the Oscars and a knighthood. He died in Switzerland in 1977. And I love him. That toothbrush moustache hid the most wonderful lips, didn’t it?

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Believe it or not, this handsome young thing is Charlie Chaplin! Yes, THAT Charlie Chaplin. The Little Tramp. The Dictator. When he was 9 he was sent to the workhouse because his mother was committed to an insane asylum & his father wasn’t on the scene. At 19 he went to the US to begin his film career. He was one of the founders of United Artists, giving actors, writers & directors control over their own work. During WWI he became the most famous actor in the world. His career was derailed by scandal, including paternity suits, divorce & a barely legal wife. All was forgiven by the 1970s, when he was given an honourary Lifetime Achievement by the Oscars and a knighthood. He died in Switzerland in 1977. And I love him. That toothbrush moustache hid the most wonderful lips, didn’t it?

Reblogged from amandaonwriting
wwnorton:

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Henry James, born 15 April 1843, died 28 February 1916

13 Henry James Quotes
Life is a predicament which precedes death.
Three things in human life are important. The first is to be kind. The second is to be kind. And the third is to be kind.
Do not mind anything that anyone tells you about anyone else. Judge everyone and everything for yourself.
We work in the dark - we do what we can - we give what we have. Our doubt is our passion, and our passion is our task. The rest is the madness of art.
I don’t want everyone to like me; I should think less of myself if some people did.
The only reason for the existence of a novel is that it does attempt to represent life.
Ideas are, in truth, force.
There are few hours in life more agreeable than the hour dedicated to the ceremony known as afternoon tea.
I hold any writer sufficiently justified who is himself in love with his theme.
It takes a great deal of history to produce a little literature.
In art economy is always beauty.
I intend to judge things for myself; to judge wrongly, I think, is more honourable than not to judge at all.
Never say you know the last word about any human heart.
James was an American-born writer who became one of his generation’s most well-known writers for works like The Portrait of a Lady and The Turn of the Screw. James’ imaginative use of point of view, interior monologue, and unreliable narrators in his own novels brought a depth and interest to realistic fiction. Having lived in England for 40 years, James became a British subject in 1915, the year before his death.
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Henry James is the bridge between George Eliot and Virginia Woolf. The Portrait of a Lady is a must-read and should be read along with Michael Gorra’s recent Portrait of a Novel: Henry James and the Making of an American Masterpiece.

wwnorton:

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Henry James, born 15 April 1843, died 28 February 1916

13 Henry James Quotes

  1. Life is a predicament which precedes death.
  2. Three things in human life are important. The first is to be kind. The second is to be kind. And the third is to be kind.
  3. Do not mind anything that anyone tells you about anyone else. Judge everyone and everything for yourself.
  4. We work in the dark - we do what we can - we give what we have. Our doubt is our passion, and our passion is our task. The rest is the madness of art.
  5. I don’t want everyone to like me; I should think less of myself if some people did.
  6. The only reason for the existence of a novel is that it does attempt to represent life.
  7. Ideas are, in truth, force.
  8. There are few hours in life more agreeable than the hour dedicated to the ceremony known as afternoon tea.
  9. I hold any writer sufficiently justified who is himself in love with his theme.
  10. It takes a great deal of history to produce a little literature.
  11. In art economy is always beauty.
  12. I intend to judge things for myself; to judge wrongly, I think, is more honourable than not to judge at all.
  13. Never say you know the last word about any human heart.

James was an American-born writer who became one of his generation’s most well-known writers for works like The Portrait of a Lady and The Turn of the Screw. James’ imaginative use of point of view, interior monologue, and unreliable narrators in his own novels brought a depth and interest to realistic fiction. Having lived in England for 40 years, James became a British subject in 1915, the year before his death.

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Henry James is the bridge between George Eliot and Virginia Woolf. The Portrait of a Lady is a must-read and should be read along with Michael Gorra’s recent Portrait of a Novel: Henry James and the Making of an American Masterpiece.

Reblogged from thedsgnblog

thedsgnblog:

Linzie Hunter   |   http://linziehunter.co.uk

Originally from Scotland, Linzie now lives in North London. A graduate of Glasgow University, she was a theatre stage manager before studying illustration at Chelsea College of Art and Design. Her freelance illustration work is created digitally but when away from the computer she enjoys traditional print-making and book-binding.

the design blog:  facebook | twitter | pinterest | subscribe

Reblogged from tinytintoto
tinytintoto:


/*
 * [004] Graph #1
 *
 * 2013 [+++] @tinytintoto
 */
int mid, dist = 0, amp, c;
final int freq = 60, spd = -15;
final float ext = 0.7;
PImage bg;
PVector last;

void setup(){
    size(500, 500);
    frameRate(24);
    smooth();
    stroke(255);
    strokeWeight(3);
    strokeCap(PROJECT);
    mid = floor(height / 2) + floor(height/12);
    amp = floor(height / 8 * 3);
    last = new PVector(width, mid);
    c = freq - 12;
    background(0);
    line(0, mid, width, mid);
}

void draw(){
    bg = get();
    background(0);
    image(bg, spd, 0);

    c++;
    dist = -(floor(dist * ext));
    if(c % freq == 0){
        dist -= random(amp);
    }
    line(last.x + spd, last.y, width, mid + dist);
    last.set(width, mid + dist, 0.0);
}

tinytintoto:


/*
 * [004] Graph #1
 *
 * 2013 [+++] @tinytintoto
 */
int mid, dist = 0, amp, c;
final int freq = 60, spd = -15;
final float ext = 0.7;
PImage bg;
PVector last;

void setup(){
    size(500, 500);
    frameRate(24);
    smooth();
    stroke(255);
    strokeWeight(3);
    strokeCap(PROJECT);
    mid = floor(height / 2) + floor(height/12);
    amp = floor(height / 8 * 3);
    last = new PVector(width, mid);
    c = freq - 12;
    background(0);
    line(0, mid, width, mid);
}

void draw(){
    bg = get();
    background(0);
    image(bg, spd, 0);

    c++;
    dist = -(floor(dist * ext));
    if(c % freq == 0){
        dist -= random(amp);
    }
    line(last.x + spd, last.y, width, mid + dist);
    last.set(width, mid + dist, 0.0);
}

(via fyprocessing)

Reblogged from ohsleeper
Reblogged from tdhasa-deactivated20140102

Reblogged from forgethowtotalk
forgethowtotalk:

//noisyRectfloat rColor, gColor, bColor, aColor;void setup() {  size(720, 480);}void draw() {  background(255);  translate(width/2, height/2);  for (int i=0; i<width; i++) {    for (int j=0; j<height; j++) {      rColor = abs(cos(i)*width/2);      gColor = abs(sin(j)*height/2);      bColor = abs(cos(i+j)*width/2);      aColor = 255;      stroke(rColor, gColor, bColor, aColor);      pushMatrix();      translate((sin(i*j))*width/5*2, (sin(millis()*0.0001))*height/5*2);      rotate(i);      rotate(j);      point(0, 0);      popMatrix();    }  }}

forgethowtotalk:

//noisyRect
float rColor, gColor, bColor, aColor;

void setup() {
  size(720, 480);
}

void draw() {
  background(255);
  translate(width/2, height/2);
  for (int i=0; i<width; i++) {
    for (int j=0; j<height; j++) {
      rColor = abs(cos(i)*width/2);
      gColor = abs(sin(j)*height/2);
      bColor = abs(cos(i+j)*width/2);
      aColor = 255;

      stroke(rColor, gColor, bColor, aColor);
      pushMatrix();
      translate((sin(i*j))*width/5*2, (sin(millis()*0.0001))*height/5*2);
      rotate(i);
      rotate(j);
      point(0, 0);
      popMatrix();
    }
  }
}

(via fyprocessing)

Reblogged from jayarrarr
Reblogged from obitoftheday
obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: International Women’s Day 2013
In honor of International Women’s Day here are some of the amazing women I’ve had the honor of featuring on Obit of the Day over the past year.
Patty Andrews - The last surviving member of The Andrews Sisters
Fontella Bass - Singer/songwriter of hit “Rescue Me”
Brig. General Margaret Brewer - 1st woman general in the U.S. Marine Corps
Rose Church - The first nurse ever hired by NASA
Ann Curtis - 1949 Olympic gold medalist and Sullivan Award winner
“Pepper” Paire Davis - Ten-year veteran of the AAGPBL and consultant for the film A League of Their Own
Leila Denmark - The oldest practicing physician in the world
Bonnie Franklin - Star of the 1970s sitcom One Day at a Time
Lena Frost - Royal Navy’s “guinea pig”
Keiko Fukuda - First woman judoka to reach the level of 9th dan
Beate Sirota Gordon - Co-authored Japan’s post WWII constitution
Maria Santos Gorrostieta - Mexican mayor who survived two assassination attempts before succumbing to a third
Edith Houghton - One of the last “Bloomer Girls” who played professional baseball and the first female scout in MLB history
Evelyn Bryan Johnson - Most flight hours by any woman in history
Moscelyne Larkin - Founder of the Tulsa Ballet
Jean Gerard Leigh - A vital part of one of the greatest military hoaxes of World War II
Daurene Lewis - Canada’s First Black Woman Mayor
Brig. General Ditta McCarthy - First woman general in the Australian army
Colonel Leontone “Lee” Meyer - One of the oldest living Marine Corps veterans
Elaine Moir - “The Waif Smuggler”
Rita Levi-Montalcini - The oldest living Nobel Prize winner
Mary Ann Morrow - First woman to serve as Illinois Chief Justice
Dr. Helen Nash - The first African American physician at St. Louis Children’s Hospital
Dawn Clark Netsch - First woman to run for governor in Illinois
Gloria Pall - Played “Voluptua” a TV host considered too sexy for 1954 standards.
Sally Ride - The first female astronaut in U.S. history
Dodi Robb - “The Queen of Canadian Children’s Television”
Doris Sams - Threw one of only four perfect games in AAGPBL history. 
Barbara Ann Scott - Canada’s first, and only, woman to win an Olympic gold medal in figure skating
Donna Summer - Five-time Grammy Award-winner
Elaine Swain - Organizer of Australia’s flight attendant union
Willa Ward - Original member of the Famous Ward Singers, an influential gospel group
And if you aren’t already you need to follow Cool Chicks From History
Image courtesy of about.com

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: International Women’s Day 2013

In honor of International Women’s Day here are some of the amazing women I’ve had the honor of featuring on Obit of the Day over the past year.

Patty Andrews - The last surviving member of The Andrews Sisters

Fontella Bass - Singer/songwriter of hit “Rescue Me”

Brig. General Margaret Brewer - 1st woman general in the U.S. Marine Corps

Rose Church - The first nurse ever hired by NASA

Ann Curtis - 1949 Olympic gold medalist and Sullivan Award winner

“Pepper” Paire Davis - Ten-year veteran of the AAGPBL and consultant for the film A League of Their Own

Leila Denmark - The oldest practicing physician in the world

Bonnie Franklin - Star of the 1970s sitcom One Day at a Time

Lena Frost - Royal Navy’s “guinea pig”

Keiko Fukuda - First woman judoka to reach the level of 9th dan

Beate Sirota Gordon - Co-authored Japan’s post WWII constitution

Maria Santos Gorrostieta - Mexican mayor who survived two assassination attempts before succumbing to a third

Edith Houghton - One of the last “Bloomer Girls” who played professional baseball and the first female scout in MLB history

Evelyn Bryan Johnson - Most flight hours by any woman in history

Moscelyne Larkin - Founder of the Tulsa Ballet

Jean Gerard Leigh - A vital part of one of the greatest military hoaxes of World War II

Daurene Lewis - Canada’s First Black Woman Mayor

Brig. General Ditta McCarthy - First woman general in the Australian army

Colonel Leontone “Lee” Meyer - One of the oldest living Marine Corps veterans

Elaine Moir - “The Waif Smuggler”

Rita Levi-Montalcini - The oldest living Nobel Prize winner

Mary Ann Morrow - First woman to serve as Illinois Chief Justice

Dr. Helen Nash - The first African American physician at St. Louis Children’s Hospital

Dawn Clark Netsch - First woman to run for governor in Illinois

Gloria Pall - Played “Voluptua” a TV host considered too sexy for 1954 standards.

Sally Ride - The first female astronaut in U.S. history

Dodi Robb - “The Queen of Canadian Children’s Television”

Doris Sams - Threw one of only four perfect games in AAGPBL history. 

Barbara Ann Scott - Canada’s first, and only, woman to win an Olympic gold medal in figure skating

Donna Summer - Five-time Grammy Award-winner

Elaine Swain - Organizer of Australia’s flight attendant union

Willa Ward - Original member of the Famous Ward Singers, an influential gospel group

And if you aren’t already you need to follow Cool Chicks From History

Image courtesy of about.com

Reblogged from matchai
screw-it-and-eat-everything:

Almond and Blackberry Cakecake recipe roughly adapted from David Lebovitzmakes one 8x3-inch cake for cake: 3/4 (105 g) + 1/4 (35 g) all-purpose flour 2 tspn baking powder 3/4 tspn salt 1 1/4 (250 g) sugar 8 oz (225 g) almond paste 1 cup (8 oz/225 g) butter, at room temperature 1 tspn orange blossom water 1 1/2 tspn almond extract 6 large eggs, at room temperature for topping: 12 oz. blackberries 1 Tbspn sugar juice of half a meyer lemon 1/4 tspn orange blossom water, opt. bittersweet (72%) chocolate curls (see note) 1. for cake. Preheat oven to 325° F. Butter and flour the insides of an 8 x 3-inch round cake pan. Line the bottom of the pan with a parchment round. Set aside. 2. In a bowl, whisk to combine ¾ cup (105 g) flour, baking powder, and salt. Set aside.  3. In the bowl of a food processor, combine the remaining ¼ cup (35 g) of flour, sugar, almond paste, and butter. Process until the almond paste is finely ground and well-combined with the butter.  4. Add in the orange blossom water and the almond extract and pulse briefly to combine.  5. Add the eggs, one at a time, processing well between each addition. Continue to process until the mixture is smooth and light.  6. Add the flour mixture to the batter in two additions, pulsing briefly after each addition just until combined, but do not overmix. 7. Pour the batter into the prepared pan. Bake in the oven for 60 – 65 minutes, until the top is brown and the sides are just beginning to pull away from the pan. Remove from the oven, let cool for 10 minutes on a wire rack.  8. Run a thin knife around the edge of the pan and turn the cake out. Place upright on a wire rack and let cool completely. 9. for topping. In a bowl, gently toss to combine the blackberries with the sugar, meyer lemon juice, and orange blossom water, if using. Let sit for 10 minutes. Top the cake with the blackberries and sprinkle liberally with chocolate curls before serving. Note: To make chocolate curls, heat a block of chocolate on high in the microwave for 5 - 10 seconds. The key is just to warm it very slightly but not to melt the chocolate. Run a vegetable peeler along the flat edges of the chocolate block to create the curls. Keep curls cool before use.

screw-it-and-eat-everything:

Almond and Blackberry Cake
cake recipe roughly adapted from David Lebovitz
makes one 8x3-inch cake

for cake:
3/4 (105 g) + 1/4 (35 g) all-purpose flour
2 tspn baking powder
3/4 tspn salt
1 1/4 (250 g) sugar
8 oz (225 g) almond paste
1 cup (8 oz/225 g) butter, at room temperature
1 tspn orange blossom water
1 1/2 tspn almond extract
6 large eggs, at room temperature

for topping:
12 oz. blackberries
1 Tbspn sugar
juice of half a meyer lemon
1/4 tspn orange blossom water, opt.
bittersweet (72%) chocolate curls (see note)

1. for cake. Preheat oven to 325° F. Butter and flour the insides of an 8 x 3-inch round cake pan. Line the bottom of the pan with a parchment round. Set aside.
2. In a bowl, whisk to combine ¾ cup (105 g) flour, baking powder, and salt. Set aside.
3. In the bowl of a food processor, combine the remaining ¼ cup (35 g) of flour, sugar, almond paste, and butter. Process until the almond paste is finely ground and well-combined with the butter.
4. Add in the orange blossom water and the almond extract and pulse briefly to combine.
5. Add the eggs, one at a time, processing well between each addition. Continue to process until the mixture is smooth and light.
6. Add the flour mixture to the batter in two additions, pulsing briefly after each addition just until combined, but do not overmix.
7. Pour the batter into the prepared pan. Bake in the oven for 60 – 65 minutes, until the top is brown and the sides are just beginning to pull away from the pan. Remove from the oven, let cool for 10 minutes on a wire rack.
8. Run a thin knife around the edge of the pan and turn the cake out. Place upright on a wire rack and let cool completely.
9. for topping. In a bowl, gently toss to combine the blackberries with the sugar, meyer lemon juice, and orange blossom water, if using. Let sit for 10 minutes. Top the cake with the blackberries and sprinkle liberally with chocolate curls before serving.

Note: To make chocolate curls, heat a block of chocolate on high in the microwave for 5 - 10 seconds. The key is just to warm it very slightly but not to melt the chocolate. Run a vegetable peeler along the flat edges of the chocolate block to create the curls. Keep curls cool before use.

(Source: matchai, via jenpelka)